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Here is a length table originally from Thomas Andraw's web site with data for length 0,7,8,9,10,11 replaced with my simulation data.

                                  Best          NT          Suit
              Length   Count    Off   Def    Off   Def    Off   Def
                   0  790809   9.62  4.53   6.13  7.25   9.61  4.58
                   1  919147   8.90  4.53   6.00  7.04   8.89  4.56
                   2 2360473   8.40  4.51   6.04  6.96   8.39  4.52
                   3 3284394   8.21  4.56   6.09  6.91   8.19  4.58
                   4 2740694   8.34  4.65   6.08  6.86   8.32  4.67
                   5 1430496   8.58  4.58   6.03  6.92   8.57  4.60
                   6  476133   8.91  4.38   6.01  7.17   8.90  4.41
                   7  545542   9.34  4.17   6.00  7.58   9.33  4.13
                   8   72434   9.85  3.82   5.97  8.08   9.84  3.87
                   9    5814  10.42  3.47   5.79  8.54  10.42  3.52
                  10     268  11.17  3.04   5.85  9.53  11.17  3.10
                  11      10  11.90  2.80   5.70  9.80  11.90  2.80

The first interesting observation is the effect of length on NT contracts. There seems to be no effect between l to length 7. There is one very interesting result for void. It seems to be extremely good in offense for NT contracts. My result uses a different double dummy database then what Thomas uses and both results are similar.

There are no surprises in suit contracts. The length of the suit increases from 4 card suit. Each additional card worth a little bit more then the previous one. (0.25, 0.33, 0.43, 0.51, 0.58Ö) Adding one point for each card more then 4 is good. Adding 1 for 5 2 for 6 4 for 7 and 6 for 8 are better. Adding 1 for 5 2.3 for 6 4 for 7 and 6 for 8 is even better. This is true if you do not add any short suit points. The longer suits have a better chance to have short suits and if you combine both you must not over value both. So if you aggressively add short suit points especially if you do that for a known suit fit, The 1 point for each additional card is more accurate.

For suit contracts the difference between a doubleton, a singleton and a void is very significant. Even though the longer the suit the more likely you have more honors, singleton still generates 0.5 more tricks then a doubleton, and 0.72 tricks less then a void. The short suit point count of 3,2,1 undervalued the void and overvalued the doubleton. The aggressive 5,3,1 when a 9+ card fit is found is very good. When combined with partners hand the problem is how to find duplicated value. A void is more likely to duplicate value in partnerís hand. Other then an A all other honors in the partnerís hand are duplicate values. If you know from the bidding there are very little duplicating value in your short suits, 4,2,1 and 6,3,1 is a better number to use for short suit points.